My subscription to Life expired, but I still have a subscription to Mad.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

My Faux QSL Cards

I just created a new webpage, My Faux QSL Cards, to accompany this blog.

I don’t send listener reports to broadcast and utility radio stations because of the time and expense involved. Instead, I create my own QSL cards for stations I log and write about in my blog.

My new webpage collects all the QSL cards I created including cards that have never seen the light of day on the blog. I hope you enjoy viewing the collection and check back often because I will add new cards to the page as I create them.

Dit dah dit

Sunday, February 23, 2020

DYO


Navigational beacon DYO was the only new logging this week. Transmitting 25 watts on 221 kHz from Rutland, Vermont, 143 miles to the north, it was a far cry from last week’s loggings of KKOH in Reno, Nevada and Radio Coro in Venezuela, but it is a new logging nonetheless!

My ICOM IC-R8600 receiver and 80-meter dipole were my receptors.

Friday, February 21, 2020

Tung-Sol World Radio Log

While looking for something else, I found this booklet in my archives. I think I acquired it about 30 years from my wife’s uncle, who was a ham radio operator.

Copyrighted 1935, the Tung-Sol World Radio Log was the World Radio TV Handbook of its day. It was very interesting perusing it and I was surprised how few radio stations were on the air from Connecticut – six to be exact. Three are still on the air today with their original call signs (WATR, WICC, WTIC. One with a different callsign (WHUS nee WCAC). And the remaining two (WMFI, WNBC) are gone. I was also surprised that back then the AM radio band ended at 1500 kHz nee kc.

The 32-page Log also lists US television stations (all 27 of them!), foreign AM/MW radio stations, world shortwave stations, ocean liner radio stations and other useful radio-related information.

You can download a copy of the booklet from here.

Monday, February 17, 2020

780 Bounty


The following announcement appeared on the IRCA mail list Saturday:

“With special thanks to Chief Engineer Daniel Appellof, and Broadcaster/DX’er Paul Walker, we have arranged for a DX Test tonight for KKOH 780 Khz in Reno, Nevada. At approximately midnight Pacific time, KKOH will switch to 50 KW Non-directional. They plan to run 15-20 minutes of DX Test material that we have provided.

“This material includes sweep tones, Morse Code IDs at 700 hz (10 words per minute), telephone off-hook sounds, and vintage voice sounders for the station. The sweep tones and telephone sounders are especially good at cutting through noise, and should give many DX’ers a chance to log the station. 

“After the test period, KKOH 780 will power down the transmitter for additional maintenance. This will provide a ‘silent period’ for West Coast DX’ers to log new stations on 780 Khz.”

WBBM in Chicago dominates 780 here and I did not think I would hear anything but WBBM if I got up at 3 AM local time to hear the test. But as luck would have it, the cat woke me up at 2:50 AM and since I was up, I went to the radio shack, turned on the IC-8600, tuned to 780 and at 07:59 UTC, turned on the recorder function of the 8600.

WBBM was loud and clear as usual, although it did experience two deep fades during the 20 minutes of  monitoring 780, but the fades did not help me hear much from KKOH. However, when WBBM was at full strength, I did copy Morse code from KKOH at 08:05:00 UTC.

Then from about 08:07:30 on, Radio Coro was very copyable playing salsa music under WBBM.

So it was a very productive morning – a new state and a new country in the log. KKOH in Reno, transmitting 50,000 watts, 2429 miles to the west and Radio Coro in Coro, Venezuela, transmitting 15,000 watts 2079 miles to the south.

I was continuously switching between antennas during the test and I heard the KKOH Morse code on the 80-meter dipole and Radio Coro on both the dipole and the 60-foot Loop on Ground (LoG) antenna.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Happy World Radio Day!


Hug a radio because today is World Radio Day!

Nothing new in the radio log. I listen every evening and before I go to bed. Conditions have been good. In fact, last night conditions were very good – I heard a half-dozen navigational beacons that were over 1,000 miles away, but nothing new to report.

Since my DNA tests 99% Polish, I will leave you with the Polish version of the World Radio Day GIF.